Slideshow: We Eat All the Tacos at La Chaparrita

All the Tacos at La Chaparrita
All the Tacos at La Chaparrita
The tacos are served on small tortillas, and come topped with cilantro and onion.
Suadero ($1.75)
Suadero ($1.75)
The best way to describe the suadero is to imagine beef carnitas. Luscious and extra beefy, this was almost over the top, but the taco was small enough that I didn't worry too much.
Longaniza ($1.75)
Longaniza ($1.75)
Think of this as La Chaparrita's interpretation of chorizo, except I can't think of another place in town that serves a version quite as good as this. The spices are there, but they don't knock you over the head. I've complained many times before that chorizo tacos usually need potatoes or eggs to help bulk them out, but this one was good to go. Phenomenal.
Lengua ($2.00)
Lengua ($2.00)
Another stunner. The tongue is actually steamed separately. When an order comes in, the meat is removed, a 1/2-inch thick piece is cut off and placed straight on a tortilla. Bad tongue is either rubbbery or mushy, but the meat here was tender while still hanging together. I haven't had lengua this good since I was last in Mexico.
Asada ($2.25)
Asada ($2.25)
Very good, but it kind of pales next to the other fillings. With so many great options you genuinely can't get anywhere else, it doesn't make much sense to waste a lot of time with the asada.
Molleja ($2.25)
Molleja ($2.25)
I've been eating tacos all over the city, and I've never seen molleja on a menu before. Turns out these are sweetbreads, and like all the other other offal cuts, it's clean tasting and flavorful. The texture is the only difficult part, tasting kind of mushy to me. All in all, I'd say this was probably my least favorite of the bunch.
Campechano ($2.25)
Campechano ($2.25)
There were no descriptions with the tacos, so I had no idea what this was at first. Turns out it's a mix of al pastor and asada. It's an interesting combo, though I think I like the al pastor better on its own.
Sesos ($2.25)
Sesos ($2.25)
And now for some brain. The meat here is very soft, almost mushy like the molleja. But I liked this one more for some reason.
Cecina ($2.25)
Cecina ($2.25)
If you want to be a little adventurous and try something beyond the carne asada, but don't feel like jumping into the offal cuts right away, this is a good way to ease into the pool. The cecina is salty and beefy, with a firm but pleasing texture.
Soft Tripa ($2.25)
Soft Tripa ($2.25)
The owner threw in another tripe taco for free just to see what we thought, this one more lightly fried. It had the same funky but satisfying flavor as the previous one, but I missed the crunchy texture. Still, I'm really glad I tried this.
The Salsas
The Salsas
Even the table salsas are outstanding. On the right is a avocado chile salsa, while on the left is a spicy red chile salsa.