Slideshow: Behind the Sweets: Jen Templeton creates Chocolate Whirlaways at Gingersnap Sweets & Such

Chocolate Whirlaways
Chocolate Whirlaways
The Whirlaway is moist, spongy, and very soft, with the smallest touch of sweetness. It really is unique—somewhere between a pecan roll and a yeast doughnut. The whirled shape isn't only aesthetically pleasing; it also makes it fun to unroll them as you eat to find the hidden chunks of chocolate.
The Set-Up
The Set-Up
First step: making the versatile Whirlaway dough. Jen crumbles a block of fresh yeast into the middle container with flour and sugar. On the left, milk is warmed on a hot plate so that it will be the right temperature to wake the yeast up when it is added.
Mix It Up
Mix It Up
Eggs join the flour, sugar, yeast, and warm milk party. When she created the recipe for Whirlaway dough, Jen loosely based it on brioche, but she didn't want the result to be quite as rich as brioche so she made a few tweaks.
Sticky Dough
Sticky Dough
The dough requires some coaxing with a bench scraper at several points on its journey to a finished Whirlaway. Here, it is literally scraped out of the bowl as opposed to a bread or brioche dough, which usually pulls away from the sides of the bowl when it is ready to be kneaded.
Nap Time
Nap Time
Jen sprinkles some flour on top of the dough, and then covers it with cling wrap. She'll let it rise for about an hour before she rolls it out.
Rolling Out the Dough
Rolling Out the Dough
Jen takes a hefty sprinkle of flour (remember, this dough is very sticky) and a small portion of the dough and quickly rolls it out. Even with the help of the flour, the dough will stick to the stainless steel table, so Jen uses a silpat as well.
Pastry Cream
Pastry Cream
Jen spreads a very thin layer of vanilla pastry cream onto the dough before slicing it into long strips.
Adding the Chocolate
Adding the Chocolate
"And yes, people always ask: I do count the chocolate."
Rolling a Whirlaway
Rolling a Whirlaway
Each long strip becomes one Whirlaway. Jen starts at the bottom and rolls her way up, making sure the chocolate doesn't slip off of the strip. The bench scraper comes into play yet again for any stubbornly stuck spots.
The Proofer
The Proofer
The rolled Whirlaways make a stop in this proofer to rest and rise a little more before being baked.
Baking
Baking
Jen has been known to bake these in small batches throughout the day, so it's possible to arrive for a fresh one even midday. Here, inverted tart pans are used as weights so the parchment paper doesn't lift up and stick to the Whirlaways as they bake.
All Poofed Up
All Poofed Up
After ten minutes or so, the Whirlaways puff up dramatically and start to brown. Their name didn't immediately come to Jen upon their creation. Instead when a friend remarked that their shape is reminiscent of a horse's hoof, she started to look up racehorses and stumbled upon Whirlaway, the name of a racehorse champion from the 1940's.